Contralateral fracture-dislocation of the shoulder due to electric shock.

youssef motiaa, wafae Elotmani, safa baba, khalid azizi

Abstract


Electrical injuries are relatively common and can produce variable types of adverse effects to organs, but injuries to musculoskeletal system are less frequent. Bone injuries can involve both long and flat bones and they encompass several types : osteonecrosis, dislocation and fracture. Cases of shoulder dislocation with fracture have been reported in the litterature ; the mechanism is linked to the tetanizing effect from the alternating current flow through the shoulder without a fall or a violent trauma. Posterior dislocation is the most common shoulder injury.

We report the case of an anterior fracture-dislocation of the shoulder contralateral to the entry point and we emphasize that any pain or functional impotence in the context of electric shock, even when it’s distant from the entry point, should trigger suspision of bone injury.


Keywords


electrical injury, fracture-dislocation, shoulder.

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DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.15342%2Fijms.v6ir.302

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